Great Pacific Cleanup

The Pacific Ocean is a part of California’s culture, from the surfing in San Diego to the boardwalk in Santa Monica, to the cliffs in Santa Cruz. When people think about California, they see beaches, the ocean, sea lions, and waves. We need to do everything we can to protect it, and the easiest thing we can do is ban plastic bags. They clog our shores and swirl in our ocean, killing millions of sea turtles and marine life every year.

California uses 12 billion plastic bags per year. All of this plastic not only clogs up our landfills, it’s also hurting the ocean. Right now there is an island of trash twice the size of Texas floating in the Pacific. This floating trash island is full of plastic bags and other artificial debris. It kills millions of birds and marine animals like sea turtles every year. If we don't start cleaning up our act here in California, it will only keep growing.

Too much of this trash heap comes from things we don’t need, like plastic grocery bags. Nothing we use for a few minutes should be polluting the ocean for hundreds of years!

To a sea turtle, a plastic bag floating in the ocean looks a lot like dinner, a jellyfish to be precise. That's why the plastic bags that find their way into the Pacific pose an often-fatal risk to wildlife. We're working to build support for a ban on plastic bags in California.

Of course, the companies that make and sell 11.9 billion bags are fighting to maintain the status quo, fronted by the lobbying team from the American Chemistry Council. But we need to do what is best for the Pacific Ocean and our future.

The rest of the world is already taking action.  More than 25 countries have plastic bag bans including India and China.  It’s time for California to lead the way to cleaning up plastic pollution in the U.S.  We've gotten a good start.  Already, fourteen cities and counties have banned plastic bags and another 29 have introduced bans.

This year, we're working to get the 9 cities our chapters are in to ban single-use plastic bags and to build support for a statewide ban. 

Issue updates

Blog Post | Oceans, Sustainability, Waste, Water

Victory: It's in the bag | Chloe Groome

Just moments ago the LA City Council voted to ban single use plastic bags - listening to the voices of students and community members who support protecting the ocean and reducing plastic pollution.

Over fifty thousand California students have signed petitions, volunteered, and made phone calls to help pass pass bag bans across the state.

Today, thanks to the efforts of students, environmental groups, and citizens across LA, we passed the biggest bag ban yet.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Oceans

L.A. City Council to Decide Wednesday Whether to Ban Plastic Bags | Chloe Groome

Will you help score the biggest win yet to keep plastic out of the Pacific?

The LA City Council will decide on Wednesday at 10am whether or not to ban plastic bags. 

And if you are from LA - click here to take action.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Oceans

Los Angeles City Council to vote on single-use, plastic- and paper-bag ban in markets

UCLA’s chapter of the California Public Interest Research Group has been campaigning in favor of the measure. In March, the Undergraduate Students Association Council voted unanimously to support CALPIRG’s campaign to ban plastic bags.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Oceans

CALPIRG protests plastic bags with giant inflatable turtle

CALPIRG held a press conference Wednesday morning to bring attention to their goal of banning plastic bags in the city of Berkeley, and eventually the whole state.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Oceans

Berkeley City Council to consider moving forward with plastic bag ban

Berkeley City Council is set to consider an item at its Tuesday meeting that would “initiate a public process to inform residents and businesses” that the council is seriously considering adopting a ban on single-use plastic bags.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed